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Carlo Scarpa
Venetian Glass, NYC

2 December 2013

Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932-1947 is the adaptation for New York of the exhibition staged by the Fondazione Giorgio Cini at the end of 2012, to a design by Marino Barovier, at Le Stanze del Vetro in Venice. It has been adapted for the occasion by the curator Nicholas Cullinan. The exhibition, presented at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, comprises around 300 works, divided into groups on the basis of the type of glass and technique utilized, and covers the fifteen years of the Venetian architect and designer’s activity as artistic director of the Venini glassworks. Over that period, Carlo Scarpa was given the freedom to experiment, introducing new techniques intended to renew the Murano tradition: techniques for the blowing and decoration of glass known as sommerso, battuto, inciso, corroso and a pennellate, along with half-filigree vases and a revival of the ancient Roman murrine. An extraordinary production that confirms the architect’s genius and the inventive capacities of the company that supported him in his creativity. Not to be missed. Until March 2, 2014.

Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932-1947

Carlo Scarpa for Venini, 1938-1948.

Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932-1947

Carlo Scarpa for Venini, 1934-1936.

Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932-1947

Carlo Scarpa for Venini, 1940, 1947.

Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932-1947

Carlo Scarpa for Venini, 1940.

Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932-1947

Carlo Scarpa for Venini, 1938.

Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932-1947

Carlo Scarpa for Venini, 1936.

Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932-1947

Carlo Scarpa for Venini, 1940.

Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932-1947

Carlo Scarpa for Venini, 1940.

Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932-1947

Carlo Scarpa (on right) with Arturo Biasutto, Murano, 1943. Archivio Storico Luce.

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Roberta Mutti

She sits astride Italy, Belgium and Southeast Asia, and sometimes falls off. When asked what she does, she replies: I do things, see people. She has been writing about furniture for twenty years and is still not tired of it, in spite of everything. She has no free time, and is not even interested in it. For her it’s enough not to have to go to the same office everyday. She mixes with unlikely people, and contributes to Klat for this very reason.


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