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Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III
Speed, Safety, Elegance

23 October 2018

Speed, safety, elegance. The new Southern Wind 105, Kiboko III, is a successful mix of these three characteristics. Built for a “loyal” customer—this is the third boat he has commissioned from the legendary boatyard in Cape Town, founded by the late lamented Willy Persico—her naval architecture is the work of Farr Yacht Design while the Milanese studio Nauta Yachts Design was responsible for the upper deck and internal layout. With a length of 32.27 meters and a width of 7.31, Kiboko (which means “hippopotamus” in Kenyan Swahili) displaces 69 metric tons: very little for a yacht of her rating. In fact the client wanted a reliable craft to take his numerous family sailing and at the same time one with as high levels of performance as possible, because his plans for the future include taking part in numerous races around the world. Quite a challenge for Bruce Farr: “Every design choice is aimed at saving weight,” explains the designer. “The hull, deck and internal structure are made entirely of carbon composite, with titanium deck fittings.” The keel is fixed, with a draft of all of 4.5 meters, but lighter than a lifting or telescopic one. This has made it possible to increase the sail area available and free up space in the saloon below deck, otherwise cluttered by the machinery used to lift the keel. Nauta has succeeded in in designing a single-level deck while keeping the freeboard low above the water. Thus the lines of the hull are clean and sleek, making the boat a feast for the eyes when underway: thanks to the presence of automatic control systems, it is possible to sail Kiboko III with a skeleton crew, if not almost single-handed. She easily reaches a speed of 15 knots, thanks to a carefully studied sail plan. The twin rudder, as well as increasing the usable space in the cockpit, means that there is room at the stern for a lazaret and a garage that can hold a 4.3-meter tender. Below deck, the main saloon is flooded with light thanks to the numerous potholes and windows: the sliding glass closure of the deckhouse is a very interesting piece of design. An ample convertible studio/TV area flawlessly separates the main saloon from the owner’s private area. The master cabin is in the bows and three en-suite cabins are set amidships to offer guests privacy and comfort. The engine room is “hidden” under the saloon, but easily accessible from the crew area, located in the stern. The furniture has a domestic feel: made of oak, it is coupled with a blue and white upholstery in typical Majorcan style. “Show, do not hide” was the motto that guided the design of the interiors, where, explains Massimo Gino of Nauta, “the furnishings let us showcase the true shape of the yacht and bring out some of the elements of her construction. We lightened and simplified the interior furnishings and left the interior hull sides and bulkheads exposed.”

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III

Southern Wind 105 Kiboko III


Eugenio Ruocco

As a boy he wanted to be a journalist. Then he discovered sailing (first racing boats, then as an instructor and finally cruising), and it was love at first sight. So he decided to unite his two passions. For years he has been working for Il Giornale della Vela and, more recently, for the magazine Barche a Motore as well. When he’s not on a boat, he plays the drums, cooks and goes hunting for mushrooms.


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