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Panton Chair, Vitra
Verner Panton

13 December 2013

Nature makes all the parts of an organism grow together, a bit at a time. In contrast, the machine rapidly produces separate pieces that then have to be assembled. But what happens if a chair is created in a single piece, and by a machine? Many people have dreamed of being able to design like this, of producing from a machine, as if by magic, a concrete, tangible version of their vision. In the second half of the sixties, thanks to innovations in technology and materials, the dream became a reality. Three designers created three chairs made from a single piece of plastic: Joe Colombo designed his Universale, Vico Magistretti his Selene and Verner Panton his Panton Chair. The sinuous curve of the latter almost makes it look like the product of a sculptor’s imagination, rather than the rational thinking of a designer. But the Panton Chair possesses the perfect functionality required by design: easily maintained, stackable and ergonomic. Manufacturer: Vitra.

Panton Chair

Panton Chair, design by Verner Panton.

Panton Chair

Panton Chair, design by Verner Panton.

Panton Chair

Panton Chair, design by Verner Panton.

Panton Chair

Panton Chair, design by Verner Panton.

Panton Chair

Panton Chair, design by Verner Panton.

Selene, di Vico Magistretti

Selene, design by Vico Magistretti.

Universal, design di Joe Colombo

Universale, design by Joe Colombo.


Domitilla Dardi

Torn between the history of art and the history of architecture, she came across design at the end of the last century and has not let go of it since. She loves to deal with everything that entails the use of ingredients, their choice, mixing and transformation: from writing to cooking, from knitting to design, from perfumes to colors. She is curator for design at the MAXXI and professor of the History of Design at the IED.


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